THE ARGUMENT BUNNY By Ian Ayris

Mr Archibald Lever was a modest man. Unassuming, even. He had the semi-detached house, the two point four children, the Nissan Micra. He was a thirty-year man at the bank, a job he’d had since he’d left school, and he had a dutiful wife by the name of Audrey.

He was happy. Pretty much.

But something bubbled within him, something dangerous, something ugly. A Continue reading THE ARGUMENT BUNNY By Ian Ayris

The Big Hurt by Paul D. Brazill

I usually like to consider myself a long distance drinker, perhaps more suited to a cross country run than a one hundred yard dash. But one winter evening, as the moon drowned in the chasm of the night, I broke into a bit of a sprint.

 

And this is what happened …

 

Continue reading The Big Hurt by Paul D. Brazill

The Wicked Woman’s Booty by Jodi MacArthur

Episode 2: “G marks the Spot”


As the sun rose, chaos plumed from The Amazon. Men grunted. Frogslingers screamed. Swords clashed. Frogs croaked.

Aboard the Wicked Woman, the sounds of plunder would typically be music to Captain Viper’s ears, but he was tired and the racket was just annoying.

Continue reading The Wicked Woman’s Booty by Jodi MacArthur

Abiding With A Dudeist ~ by Rev. Ed Churchman

“The Stranger: The Dude abides. I don’t know about you but I take comfort in that. It’s good knowin’ he’s out there. The Dude. Takin’ ‘er easy for all us sinners. Shoosh. I sure hope he makes the finals.”

Once Upon A Time there was a film by the Coen Brothers called The Big Lebowski. It was a film about friendship, bowling, White Russians, vaginas, a girl named Bunny who’ll suck your cock for 1000$ , nihilists, a marmot, rolling on the Shabbas, I Am The Walrus, a ringer, a Special Lady & an iconic figure named The Dude. Some loved it. Some hated it. A lot of people really loved it. & so Lo! & Behold! Dudeism was born. Uh, excuse me, what day is this? What is Dudeism exactly?

Rev. Ed Churchman is here to explain what Dudeism means to him.

Continue reading Abiding With A Dudeist ~ by Rev. Ed Churchman

I Let A Man Live by Dan Tracy

Back in 1979 I lived in Bridgeport, Connecticut and worked the second shift, 3-11 in Norwalk, Connecticut. I took the train everyday to and from work. It took me approximately 20 minutes to walk from the East Norwalk station to work and 20 minutes from the Bridgeport station to home.

One night on my way home from the Bridgeport station two guys walked up to me and asked for some change. As I reached into my pocket one of the guys steps behind me, gets on all fours and Continue reading I Let A Man Live by Dan Tracy

Wuthering Heights and the Mothership by Melanie Browne

I watched Wuthering heights a lot when I broke my ankle. They were playing it

on the classic movie channel. My favorite scene from the movie is when Cathy tells Heathcliff she wants him to fill her arms with heather.” All that they can hold.” she tells him.

Continue reading Wuthering Heights and the Mothership by Melanie Browne

Collateral Damage by Charlie Coleman

 

“Hey, please, do you have a minute?” said the raven haired, dark skinned Gauguin style beauty leaning out of the BMW. Her words echoed down the deserted street with her soft, caressing voice distilling any anxiety gestated by the surrounding isolation. They echoed off of the nearby bank windows innocently enough.

“I only need a minute of your time, please!”  That snag statement rolled out of her sensual mouth like chocolate syrup cascading down the sides of vanilla ice cream.

“What can I do for you,” inquired the well dressed man who had just left the bank. His attire proffered all indications of executive status. As he spied her and approached the car his mind raced ensnarling him with a smorgasbord of imagined, delicious sexual encounters.

Continue reading Collateral Damage by Charlie Coleman

Tim Hall – Business Reply Mail

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About 15 years ago I got so sick of those BRCs that fall out of magazines that I began painting/writing nasty messages on them and mailing them back, then liked them so much I began keeping them for myself. It’s my medium, my amanuensis…even my oeuvre, you might say ...”

“Tim Hall’s latest book is How America Died.

Buy it here:  http://undiepress.timhallbooks.com)

Interview & Art – LUIGI CLEMENTE

By Jason Michel

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I’ve been unlucky enough to know Luigi for a number of years now. He is an Italian, from Genova, living in London. His photography is something special. Decadent and, at times, has an everyday Surreality. It reminds me of listening to Madder Rose with him over a beer in London. He is a wry & miserable bugger, though.

*

JM: Luigi, inspiration. Where in God’s Balls does it come from?

LC: From the nose.

JM: I’ve seen your nose and I have to say, it is inspirational. I’ve noticed that you use a lot of masks in your Portraits, what’s with that?

LC: Thanks for your question. Now I need to think, and you know I hate doing that. Masks. They don’t hide the identity. They reveal it. They create an identity where there is no identity. Our social avatar (the face we paint, the hair we cut, the body we shape) is not us. There is no us, to be precise. And this disturbing vacuum is revealed in all its inescapable horror when we wrap it in a solid, clear, coloured, definite structure: the mask. Like insects, like cicadas, we need an exoskeleton to move, laugh and sing and live, made of plastic, cardboard or simply sick imagination, as you prefer. Masks. I got one from my cousin.

JM: It is interesting that you mention that “there is no us”. This is an old idea, that goes back to Buddhist thought and modern neuroscience is showing us that it may in fact be true. What influences outside of photography have found their way into your particular art? By this I mean, books, other artists, music?
 
LC: Influences. In photography. A classic one, sorry for being so banal: Cartier-Bresson. I like the composition, the equilibrium of shapes and lines and focus points, the delicate tension, the irony. I like the photoshop artists, like Dragan. I like painting: Renaissance masters, like Raffaello. And for the portraits, may I dare to mention Rembrandt? His masterful way of handling light and darkness? Sharp details and softness? Music. There’s nothing more visual than music. I like dark, gloomy, gothic soft musical textures. Try Hope Sandoval, try Cranes. Dim the lights. Close your eyes. There’s no picture like that. Low saturation, diffused background, high contrast. if you want to smile, a slightly sad smile, listen to Paolo Conte. Books? I can’t read …

JM: Okay, last question … Luigi, how important is place for you? You are Italian, from Genova, yet you live in London. Why did you choose Deare Olde Londinium to live? Grazie tante! Ciao!

LC: The city is both a physical and a metaphysical space. A city is a background for your pictures, portraits or landscapes. It sets the mood and the rules. It gives you subjects: bridges or people. I was born in an old and dying city. Genova is dying of old age. You can walk in the alleys, and get a sense of history, of the past, but no sense of future. The present is confused, still, frozen in amber. People live awaiting. Godot is not coming yet. And when the wind is strong, the voice of the sea grows louder, and you forget where you are, who you are. I missed that sometimes. I missed my sea. I missed my dirty alleys, and small vineries. So I feel out of scale here in London, but then there is the metaphysical aspect. London offers me the gift of the long tail, a chance to socialise around an interest, whatever it is. In this case, photography. I chose London for this. It gave me, and probably will still give me (for a while, at least), the hope of being surprised.

And life without any surprises, what kind of life is it?

*

Luigi’s magnificent work can be found: HERE!

A Conversation With Ed Mironiuk

By Jason Michel

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Ed Mironiuk paints women. Curvy & delectable Goddesses peering down on us weak male-of-the-species. His art looks back to The Golden Age of Pin-Ups and drags them through a Pop Culture mudbath to his own style of Low Bizarro Art, as his website says – “a hybrid of pop trash and fetish culture kissed by Dr. Moreau himself”.  Sounds interesting? He agreed to a Conversation with yours truly.

Continue reading A Conversation With Ed Mironiuk

"Write What Thou Wilt"

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